Museum Download Page


The Museum comprises well over a thousand files, totaling about 20 megabytes of data. The author and curator of the Museum, Carol A. Valentine, encourages students of the Waco incident to copy the Museum to their local computers for study, and even for web site mirroring if possible.  Having a local personal copy enables the user to view the materials without the delay and other problems associated with network connections. Having the Museum on a local platform also enables the user to give away copies of the Museum to friends, guaranteeing its survival following Operation InterNet Knockdown (code name: OINK).

Copying the Museum

Some versions of Internet Explorer include a feature for copying a web site into a single large file, pictures, text, and all.  In many cases, this would be quite adequate, though it has limited use in that the information could not be reconstructed for site mirroring on an Internet server. This copy will consume between 20 and 25 megabytes of disk space.

There are also some shareware programs for downloading web pages.
 

Web Buddy by Dataviz http://www.dataviz.com (apparently no longer available)
Page Sucker from Page Sucker http://www.pagesucker.com (said to work on Macs, but PC version is bugged)
WebWhacker 2000 by Blue Squirrel http://www.bluesquirrel.com/products/whacker/whacker.html
SurfSaver 2.0 by askSam http://www.surfsaver.com

Download Archives

To facilitate the widest dissemination of information in this Museum, compressed archive files of the entire site are available from this site.  The well known pkzip program is used to bundle the files into packages and compress them. Pkzip and pkunzip software is available over the Internet from the vendor, PK WARE. (For Windows 95 and beyond, a GUI version of the program is available, called WINZIP.)


Instructions for PKZIP

The links below may be used, one at a time, to download these archive files. When the files have been copied to the local computer, they should be put in the directory where the Museum is to be housed. Each file is unzipped with the command:
pkunzip -n -d filename
Downloading all files may take two hours or more, depending on the quality of the connection. It may save time to unzip each file as it is acquired to ensure that the copying is occurring correctly.

The "-n -d" options in the pkunzip command are required to recreate the necessary directory structure. GUI-driven WinZip assumes these options as the default.

Once the files are on the local computer, they may be viewed with the same browser used to view them on the network. Usually the option for opening a local file is in the FILE menu. If the current browser is found to be unsatisfactory, perhaps another should be tried. A list of available (and easily acquired) html browsers MS Windows 3.x can be found on the Internet through the Chicago Computer Society.

When the Museum text has been copied and unzipped, the entry file for the Museum is

index.htm
in the same directory where the Zip files were opened.

Previously, versions of the Museum were offered for both UNIX and DOS. Because on the lack of demand for the UNIX compressed tar files, that feature has now been dropped. If the platform for installation is something other than DOS (Windows, Win95, Win98, Windows NT, etc.), the shareware ZIP utility can be downloaded from the Internet to unzip these files on other platforms.  Zip comes with many distributions of Linux. Note that with ZIP, the default behavior recreates the directory structure, and the command is run as follows:

unzip filename
In order to serve visitors who have limited resources and facilitate updates, the Museum files are grouped into sections.  Both suites are available on two servers.  Use whichever server gives the best service in your area.
 

Public Action Server

  1. Museum text (about 1.8M) contains all of the html-coded documentation, the analysis text, and the linking between pages. If only these files were available, one would still have a very comprehensible version of the Museum.

  2.  
  3. Pictures (about 5.9M) contains the JPEG-encoded pictures. All of the Museum color pictures are JPEG encoded because this format was found to give the best resolution with the best compression, resulting in fast, informative pages.

  4.  
  5. Supporting Documents (about 4.6M) contains holographic documentation, including scanned news clippings and court transcripts.

  6.  
  7. Autopsies (about 8.9M) contains images of the autopsy reports from the McLennan County Justice of the Peace.

  8.  

XOOM Server

  1. Museum text (about 1.8M) contains all of the html-coded documentation, the analysis text, and the linking between pages. If only these files were available, one would still have a very comprehensible version of the Museum.

  2.  
  3. Pictures (about 5.9M) contains the JPEG-encoded pictures. All of the Museum color pictures are JPEG encoded because this format was found to give the best resolution with the best compression, resulting in fast, informative pages.

  4.  
  5. Supporting Documents (about 4.6M) contains holographic documentation, including scanned news clippings and court transcripts.

  6.  
  7. Autopsies (about 8.9M) contains images of the autopsy reports from the McLennan County Justice of the Peace.

To make this information available in even wider circles, the following compressed text file sets are also available:

Back: Museum Library
Home: Museum Entrance
Search: Museum Text


Many people who distrust the mainstream media have turned to alternate news sources, some of which are Internet based.  Unfortunately, many of these alternate sources of news simply promote an alternate series of lies.  These alternate lies are of course dressed up as "exposés."  But you can easily tell the phonies from the real thing.  The information in the Waco Holocaust Electronic Museum is an acid test.

Does your news source promote Mike McNulty's video, Waco: The Rules of Engagement or wring its hands because the Davidian law suit against the government failed?  (See Waco Documentary Is A Hoax! and Waco Suits for Waco Suckers.) Does your alternate news source carry promotional pieces about rebuilding the Davidian church in Waco and mouth nice words about "healing"?  (See The Cover-up Church.)

Remember, since ancient times, inquiries into questionable deaths have started with the bodies of the victims.  If your news source won't give you an honest and full account of the forensic information on Waco, or if it does not have a link to the Waco Holocaust Electronic Museum ... your alternate news has failed a fundamental acid test.


Published by Public Action, Inc., a news and news analysis service. All commercial rights are reserved. A full statement of terms and conditions for copying and redistribution is available in the Museum Library. "Waco Holocaust Electronic Museum," "SkyWriter," and the sky writing logo are trademarks of Public Action, Inc. To receive occasional dispatches on Waco issues, write to Curator@Public-Action.com and put SUBSCRIBE in the subject line.

http://www.Public-Action.com/SkyWriter/WacoMuseum
or http://206.55.8.10/SkyWriter/WacoMuseum
Curator@Public-Action.com

All original material is copyright 1996-2000 by Carol A. Valentine, on loan to Public Action, Inc.
Postal Address: Carol A. Valentine, PO Box 10933, Burke, VA 22009

This page last updated February 28, 2001.